In a World of Dinosaurs features four unique teams filled with different personalities from across the globe, all gathered on one island with the same goal; to frantically brush away small amounts of dirt in a race to discovery.

 

TEKTON INDUSTRIES BONE WAREHOUSE

 
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PALEONTOLOGISTS ON STAFF

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JESSICA MARTIN

Jessica is a geologist/paleontologist transplanted from sunny, warm Florida to the extremes of Montana. She leads dig expeditions into the Hell Creek badlands in the blazing hot summers and teaches budding scientists during the frigid off season. Jessica is always searching for a new Cretaceous meat-eating dinosaur, but gets a thrill with uncovering even the smallest fossil. All of her amazing finds are in the town museum for the locals to enjoy. She believes in a work hard, play hard ethic and expects the same of her interns.

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VICTOR

Victor has already reached levels of prestige as a Paleontologist that very few dare to even dream; but what he is most known for is his ability to lead teams through harrowing circumstances. Snow storm in Saskatchewan? Check. Mudslides in Madagascar? Not a problem. Altitude sickness in the Andes? He has aspirin. While this is all well and good, you may be wondering; why doesn’t Victor use his last name? Luckily, he answered that question at a dig site in Central America.
”It’s simply Victor. You don’t need more than that now, and you definitely don’t need more than that when this cave starts to collapse.”

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DUSTY BOHN

Dusty’s fascination with fossils became apparent at an early age, when he bored a hole through the bottom of his crib to retrieve a dusty pacifier he had dropped the week before. When he was a little older he studied at the Sorbonne, but dropped out due to ennui. Buried buildings did not set his guts a-flutter; he had a passion for paleontology, and it smashed into his consciousness like an asteroid striking the rich loamy soil of his mind, creating an intellectual dust cloud that blotted out everything else. Fossils fueled his fervid fact-finding forays; he could not be contained in a classroom; he needed to be out in the field, unearthing unknown ungulates and sweeping sand specks off new specimens.


TEKTON INTERNS

ABBY KISS: Originally sought a career in arithmetic, but it didn't add up.
K.C. DUNYELLIN: Loves quiet puns, redundancy, and subtle word play.
MELISSA ZOIC: A bit old for an intern.


NATURAL DINOSAUR MUSEUM OF AUSTRALIA

 
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Situated in Canberra, Australia's capital city, it is one of the premiere tourist attractions in the area. Starting from humble beginnings, the museum has grown from a small collection to housing the largest permanent display of dinosaur and other prehistoric fossil material in Australia.

The museum's exhibits take you on a journey through time, from the Earth's beginnings to some of the most recent animals. Through this you can follow the evolution of life, and see just how successful the dinosaurs were. With 23 complete skeletons, and over 300 displays of individual fossils, the museum continues to grow and expand our collection from Allosaurus to Velociraptor.


PALEONTOLOGISTS ON STAFF

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TOM KAPITANY

Tom is a specialist at finding and selling fossils and rare artefacts. He has travelled the world, from the Arctic Circle to the Sahara desert, searching for the rare and the unusual. Many people dislike his economic approach to palaeontology however he just smirks as he climbs into his private jet, champagne in hand, ready for his next adventure. His years of experience and economic success fund his research and he doesn’t have to answer to anyone. His interns are equipped with the latest technology and are highly trained fossil hunters. He has come to the island for the next big score, he’s spared no expense.

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CAMERON McKENZIE

Cameron has only recently graduated and is still inexperienced. After years of study, tedious lectures and countless nights of ramen noodles for dinner he’s ready to realize his dream and become a real paleontologist. Often confused for one of his interns due to his age, Cameron makes up for his inexperience with sheer enthusiasm and willingness to try new techniques. Armed with his trusty Geo pick, a tight budget and copious notes this is Cameron’s first expedition in charge and has come to the island to make a name for himself.

ANDREW RUFFIN

Professional preparator of fossils and museum specimens with 20 years’ experience. After years of reconstructing dinosaurs from all over the world, Andrew is capable of turning even the dullest fossils into the terrifying exhibits found in our museums. He is a risk taker often found exploring the most hazardous areas others steer clear of. Sheer cliffs, choppy seas, thick jungles, barren deserts and freezing temperatures are just new challenge of overcome to find the next big thing.


MUSEUM OF AUSTRALIA INTERNS

MICHAEL DUNDAY: Dedicated to studying the difference between crocodiles and their long lost brethren.
JERRY S. PARK: Very determined, Jerry, uh, finds a way.
RON TUHSORAS: Always seems to be sticking his neck out, and has a great vocabulary.


HUGHES-REILLY SCIENCE PLACE

 
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PALEONTOLOGISTS ON STAFF

CLEAR JACKSON

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CONNOR McGAULEY

Born in Austin, TX. His very first word was "fossil." Went on his first paleontology dig at age 5. Teachers often let him leave school early to get extra digging time in. Discovered two new dinosaur species before his 11th birthday. Most famous for being instrumental in getting the Apatosaurus renamed the Brontosaurus in most K-12 textbooks. Hobbies including playing the violin, collecting rare empty whiskey bottles, and Corvettes.

PICKLES HENRY

This mild mannered pooch was born with an innate ability to dig for bones that far surpassed his peers. While many of his contemporaries fixated on the discoveries of chicken bones or the occasional beef rib, Pickles dreamed bigger.


HUGHES-REILLY INTERNS

JAX STICKMAN:
TOMMY TWOTOWNS:
Not know for his adventurous spirit. That is all.
SARA TOPS III:
Simply the best. Much better than that Peg O. Sorus


OLD TRAIL DINOSAUR EMPORIUM

 
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Perched in a small town in the Northwestern United States, the Old Trail Dino Emporium (founded by Tess and Will Domhnall) grew up amidst a vast array of local dig sites. Sadly, the museum has never done well attracting locals, and likely would have shuttered it's doors years ago if it weren't for the success of a connected malt shop. The Old Trail slogan says it all: Love the Ice Cream Parlor? Well, the Old Trail Dinosaur Emporium is also pretty sweet.


PALEONTOLOGISTS ON STAFF

PAT GARIBALDI

Pat stumbled upon a fully intact Triceratops while planting in her garden early one morning, and despite a small gardening trowel being her only tool, she removed the bones in perfect condition. In a hurry to get back to her Begonias, she donated the fossils to the nearest museum through their after hours deposit box, and quickly went back to work on her flowers. When the lead Scientist at the museum arrived to find the impeccably preserved specimen, she immediately started to search for the talented troweler that had unearthed the beast. Luckily, the paleontologist noticed a small trail of potting soil leading away from the deposit box. She followed it back to find Pat, and she was hired that day.

DAISY OOPSIE

Daisy is the only child of Old Trail Emporium founders, Tess and Will Domhnall. As a child, she was not allowed in the museum because of her penchant for bumping expensive exhibits, tipping delicate displays, and toppling wobbly works. The Domhnalls, to avoid this problem, started to send Daisy into the field, and out of the museum. This is where Daisy discovered something amazing. See, with nothing delicate around, Daisy’s nature led her to accidentally discover fragile items that may never have been found. “Ouch! I tripped and hit my elbow on this… undiscovered Triceratops skull?” She is now a key member on all exploratory missions, as are extra bandages.

MEAGHAN O’SAURUS

At the inagural Dublin Dino Diggin' Days, Meaghan was discovered after successfully identifying a fossil from 50 meters as the femur of a Stegosaurus. She was quickly recruited by the lead paleontologists of the day, and her feat became famous around the world, earning her the nickname Meg "The Leg" O'Saurus. Some find it hard to believe, but she claims it was no fibula.


OLD TRAIL INTERNS

IVAN GRADNIER: Unsure why he took this job, outside of the health benefits, and those don't help you at the bottom of a spike pit.
DOUG DIGGS:
Doug digs. That's all Diggs does. Doug Diggs does digs.
TERA TACTILE:
Feels it best to take a hands-on approach.